Mac Millers drug supplier pleads guilty to distribution of fentanyl – Daily Mail

Mac Miller’s drug supplier has pleaded guilty to one count of distribution of fentanyl.

Stephen Walter, 46, the man who allegedly supplied the lethal Percocet pills which led to Miller’s overdose and death, entered a guilty plea with the feds, TMZ reported on Tuesday, citing court documents.

A second drug-related charge for conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance was dropped.

Miller was just 26 when he died of an accidental overdose of the powerful opioid fentanyl, along with cocaine and alcohol in 2018.  

Mac Miller's drug supplier has pleaded guilty to one count of distribution of fentanyl (Miller pictured in 2013)

Mac Miller's drug supplier has pleaded guilty to one count of distribution of fentanyl (Miller pictured in 2013)

Mac Miller’s drug supplier has pleaded guilty to one count of distribution of fentanyl (Miller pictured in 2013)

Walter is facing a maximum punishment of more than 20 years in prison, in addition to a lifetime of supervised release and a $1 million fine. 

Prosecutors have recommended Walter receive 17 years in prison and five years of supervised release.

According to TMZ, ‘prosecutors make a point to say that Walter pleading guilty here means he was fully aware of what he was pawning off that night – counterfeit oxycodone pills laced with fentanyl.’ 

In addition to Walker, Ryan Michael Reavis and Cameron James Pettit have also been charged in connection to the rapper’s death. 

Miller was just 26 when he was found dead from a drug overdose at his home in 2018

Miller was just 26 when he was found dead from a drug overdose at his home in 2018

Miller was just 26 when he was found dead from a drug overdose at his home in 2018

A picture of the drugs given to Miller just days before his death, according to court documents

A picture of the drugs given to Miller just days before his death, according to court documents

A picture of the drugs given to Miller just days before his death, according to court documents

In a grand jury indictment, Walter, along with Pettit and Reavis were charged with conspiring to distribute controlled substances resulting in death, and distribution of fentanyl resulting in death. 

The unsealed indictment – which is 12 pages long – alleges that Walter supplied the fentanyl and cocaine that Pettit sold to Miller, while Reavis acted as a middleman.

Shortly after the indictment was unsealed, Pettit pleaded not guilty. 

On September 5 2018 – two days before he died – Miller allegedly purchased cocaine, Xanax and 10 blue pills that appeared to be oxycodone from Petit.

In a grand jury indictment, Walter, along with Cameron Petit and Ryan Reavis were charged with conspiring to distribute controlled substances resulting in death, and distribution of fentanyl resulting in death (Miller pictured 2018)

In a grand jury indictment, Walter, along with Cameron Petit and Ryan Reavis were charged with conspiring to distribute controlled substances resulting in death, and distribution of fentanyl resulting in death (Miller pictured 2018)

In a grand jury indictment, Walter, along with Cameron Petit and Ryan Reavis were charged with conspiring to distribute controlled substances resulting in death, and distribution of fentanyl resulting in death (Miller pictured 2018)

In texts purportedly written by Miller to Petit, the rapper proclaimed his love for oxycodone, or ‘percs’ for the brand name Percocet.

However, the oxycodene pills he is said to have purchased were counterfeit, and actually contained fentanyl – a synthetic opioid 50 times more potent than heroin.

Miller was found dead by his assistant at his Los Angeles home on September 7, 2018. 

On September 5 2018 – two days before he died – Miller allegedly purchased cocaine, Xanax and 10 blue pills that appeared to be oxycodone from Petit.

In texts purportedly written by Miller to Petit, the rapper proclaimed his love for oxycodone, or ‘percs’ for the brand name Percocet.

Miller's beats and rhymes, with their frank expressions of drug use and depression, made him a beloved and respected figure among fans, including some of the biggest names in hip-hop

Miller's beats and rhymes, with their frank expressions of drug use and depression, made him a beloved and respected figure among fans, including some of the biggest names in hip-hop

Miller’s beats and rhymes, with their frank expressions of drug use and depression, made him a beloved and respected figure among fans, including some of the biggest names in hip-hop

However, the oxycodene pills he is said to have purchased were counterfeit, and actually contained fentanyl – a synthetic opioid 50 times more potent than heroin.

Miller was found dead by his assistant at his Los Angeles home on September 7.

Both Reavis and Walter have criminal records involving drugs, according to the indictment.

In another set of text messages included in the indictment, Reavis worried in a text about undercover police buying drugs.

‘People have been dying from fake blues left and right,’ the message said, ‘you better believe law enforcement is using informant informants and undercover to buy them on the street so they can start putting ppl in prison for life for selling fake pills.’

Miller’s beats and rhymes, with their frank expressions of drug use and depression, made him a beloved and respected figure among fans, including some of the biggest names in hip-hop.

The Pittsburgh native, whose real name was Malcolm James Myers McCormick, was in a two-year relationship with Ariana Grande that ended earlier in 2018. After his death, the pop star posted a loving video of him on her Instagram page and released a song, ‘Thank U Next,’ that affectionately mentioned him.

Three months after his death, Miller was posthumously nominated for a 2019 Grammy Award for Best Rap Album for his highly-acclaimed LP, Swimming.

The Pittsburgh native, whose real name was Malcolm James Myers McCormick, was in a two-year relationship with Ariana Grande that ended earlier in 2018

The Pittsburgh native, whose real name was Malcolm James Myers McCormick, was in a two-year relationship with Ariana Grande that ended earlier in 2018

The Pittsburgh native, whose real name was Malcolm James Myers McCormick, was in a two-year relationship with Ariana Grande that ended earlier in 2018

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