2021 Wildlife Photographer Of The Year Winners Announced : The Picture Show – NPR

High-flying jay by Lasse Kurkela, Finland, Winner, 15-17 Years. Lasse Kurkela views a Siberian jay fly to the top of a spruce tree to stash its food. Kurkela wished to offer a sense of scale in his photograph of the Siberian jay, tiny amongst the old-growth spruce-dominated forest. He used pieces of cheese to get the jays accustomed to his from another location managed video camera.

Lasse Kurkela/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

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Lasse Kurkela/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

High-flying jay by Lasse Kurkela, Finland, Winner, 15-17 Years. Lasse Kurkela watches a Siberian jay fly to the top of a spruce tree to stash its food.

Lasse Kurkela/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Its called Creation, and records camouflage groupers leaving a milky cloud of eggs and sperm in a biosphere reserve in Fakarava, French Polynesia. The museum stated that Laurent and his team went back to the lagoon every year for 5 years, “diving day and night so as not to miss the yearly spawning that just takes location around the complete moon in July.”

Creation by Laurent Ballesta, France, Winner, Underwater. Laurent Ballesta peers into the depths as a trio of camouflage groupers leave their milky cloud of eggs and sperm. For five years Ballesta and his team returned to this lagoon, diving day and night to see the annual spawning of camouflage groupers. They were joined after dark by reef sharks hunting the fish.

The latest Wildlife Photographer of the Year is French underwater professional photographer and biologist Laurent Ballesta, whose first-place image was actually years in the making.

The entries in this years competitors– the 57th edition– were evaluated anonymously by a panel of global experts for “creativity, story, technical excellence and ethical practice.”

The winning pictures of the 2021 Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition are here, and theyre enthralling.

The yearly occasion is organized by Londons Museum of Natural History and acknowledged as the worlds longest-running and many prominent nature photography competition. In revealing the winners on Tuesday, the museum said it had gotten more than 50,000 submissions from 95 nations.

” The 2 Grand Title winners were selected from 19 classification winners that celebrate the fascinating charm of our natural world with rich habitats, fascinating animal behaviour and amazing species,” the museum explained.

Laurent Ballesta/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

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Laurent Ballesta/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Vidyun R. Hebbar/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Where the giant amphibians reproduce by João Rodrigues, Portugal, Winner, Behaviour: Amphibians and Reptiles. João Rodrigues is amazed by a pair of courting sharp-ribbed salamanders in the flooded forest. It was Rodrigues very first chance in 5 years to dive in this lake as it just emerges in winter seasons of incredibly heavy rainfall, when underground rivers overflow.

One hundred images from the competition– contextualized with insights from researchers and other professionals– will be showcased in lightbox displays at an unique Natural History Museum exhibit. It will open in London on Friday, and travel to places in the U.K., Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Germany and the U.S. in the coming months.

” This years Grand Title winner exposes a surprise undersea world, a fleeting minute of remarkable animal behaviour that extremely couple of have witnessed,” stated Doug Gurr, the museums director. “In what could be an essential year for the planet, with crucial discussions happening at COP15 and COP26, Laurent Ballestas Creation is a compelling pointer of what we stand to lose if we do not deal with humanitys effect on our planet. The defense provided to this endangered species by the biosphere reserve highlights the favorable difference we can make.”

” The jury liked this image from the start of the evaluating process,” stated Natalie Cooper, a jury member and National History Museum researcher. “It is a fantastic pointer to look more carefully at the little animals we cope with every day, and to take your electronic camera with you all over. You never ever understand where that award winning image is going to come from.”

Dome house by Vidyun R Hebbar, India, Winner, 10 Years and Under. Vidyun R Hebbar enjoys a camping tent spider as a tuk-tuk passes by.

His image reveals a tent spider upside down in a web, versus the bright colors of a passing tuk-tuk in the background. The museum stated Hebbar enjoys to photograph the “typically neglected animals that reside in the streets and parks near his home,” and was first featured in the competition at the age of eight.

Dome house by Vidyun R Hebbar, India, Winner, 10 Years and Under. Vidyun R Hebbar views a tent spider as a tuk-tuk passes by.

The leading award in the 17-and-under classification went to 10-year-old Vidyun R Hebbar of Bengaluru, India.

Take a look at a few of the sensational images from contest finalists below.

Camouflage groupers as a species are threatened by overfishing, the museum noted, though these particular fish are protected within the reserve.

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Vidyun R. Hebbar/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Vidyun R. Hebbar/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

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And for any curious wildlife photographers reading this: The 2022 competition will accept entries starting Monday, and closes on Dec. 9.

João Rodrigues/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

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João Rodrigues/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Elephant in the room by Adam Oswell, Australia, Winner, Photojournalism. Adam Oswell accentuates zoo visitors viewing a young elephant carry out underwater.

Adam Oswell/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

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Adam Oswell/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Head to head by Stefano Unterthiner, Italy, Winner, Behaviour: Mammals. Stefano Unterthiner watches two Svalbard reindeer fight for control of a hareem.

Stefano Unterthiner/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

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Stefano Unterthiner/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Bedazzled by Alex Mustard, UK, Winner, Natural Artistry. Alex Mustard finds a ghost pipefish hiding among the arms of a plume star. Mustard had actually always wished to capture this picture of a juvenile ghost pipefish but normally just found darker grownups on matching feather stars.

Alexander Mustard/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

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Alexander Mustard/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Reflection by Majed Ali, Kuwait, Winner, Animal Portraits. Majed Ali peeks the moment a mountain gorilla closes its eyes in the rain.

Majed Ali/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

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Majed Ali/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Angel M. Fitor/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Angel M. Fitor/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

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Face-off, from Cichlids of Planet Tanganyika by Angel Fitor, Spain, Winner, Portfolio Award. Angel Fitor supplies an intimate look into the lives of cichlid fishes in Lake Tanganyika.

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Nursery meltdown by Jennifer Hayes, USA, Winner, Oceans: The Bigger Picture. Jennifer Hayes records harp seals, seal puppies and the blood of birth against melting sea ice. Following a storm, it took hours of browsing by helicopter to discover this fractured sea ice utilized as a birthing platform by harp seals. “It was a pulse of life that took your breath away,” states Hayes.

Jennifer Hayes/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

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Jennifer Hayes/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Cool time, from Land time for sea bears by Martin Gregus, Canada/Slovakia, Winner, Rising Star Portfolio Award. Martin Gregus shows polar bears in a various light as they come ashore in summer season. On a hot summer seasons day, 2 female polar bears took to the shallow intertidal waters to cool off and play. Gregus utilized a drone to record this minute.

Martin Gregus/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

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Martin Gregus/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

The intimate touch by Shane Kalyn, Canada, Winner, Behaviour: Birds. Shane Kalyn views a raven courtship screen. It was midwinter, the start of the ravens breeding season. Kalyn lay on the frozen ground using the soft light to capture the detail of the ravens iridescent plumage against the contrasting snow to reveal this intimate moment when their thick black expenses came together.

Shane Kalyn/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

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Shane Kalyn/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Roadway to ruin by Javier Lafuente, Spain, Winner, Wetlands – The Bigger Picture. Javier Lafuente shows the stark, straight line of a roadway slicing through the curves of the wetland landscape. By steering his drone and inclining the cam, Lafuente dealt with the difficulties of sunshine shown by the water and ever-changing light conditions.

Javier Lafuente/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

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Javier Lafuente/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

High-flying jay by Lasse Kurkela, Finland, Winner, 15-17 Years. High-flying jay by Lasse Kurkela, Finland, Winner, 15-17 Years.” This years Grand Title winner exposes a hidden underwater world, a fleeting moment of interesting animal behaviour that really couple of have seen,” stated Doug Gurr, the museums director. Dome home by Vidyun R Hebbar, India, Winner, 10 Years and Under. Dome home by Vidyun R Hebbar, India, Winner, 10 Years and Under.

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